Program

Program

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Wednesday, July 17, 2019

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. - Early Registration and Welcome Reception for early arrivals (Good Life Garden, Robert Mondavi Institute)

 

Thursday, July 18, 2019

7:30 a.m. - Registration at ARC Conference Ballroom

6:45 - 8:30 am: Breakfast at Segundo Dining Commons (Participants will be given a meal card at registration)

All conference oral presentations will be held in the ARC Conference Ballroom

8:45 a.m. - Opening remarks and welcome

9:00 a.m. - Keynote: The Importance of People in Pollinator Conservation

Lynn Dicks, School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, UK

10:00 a.m. - Session 1: Novel Quantitative Methods in Pollinator Ecology & Management

The Role of Bee and Non-Bee Pollinators in Australian Open and Protected Cropping Systems (How do we overcome the pollination challenges?) - Romina Rader, University of New England, Australia

Implementing a Honeybee Foraging Model and REDAPOLL Fruit Set Predictions in Washington State’s Decision Aid System - Vince Jones, Washington State University, USA

Using DNA metabarcoding techniques to improve plant-pollinator interaction networks - Victoria Reynolds, University of Queensland, Australia

Citizen Science Data for Mapping Bumblebee Populations - Claudio Gratton, University of Wisconsin      

From Theory to Practice: The Bumble-BEEHAVE Model and its Application to Enhance Pollinator Friendly Land Management - Matthias Becher, University of Exeter, UK

A laboratory system to study the effects of stressors on honey bee health and fecundity - Julia Fine, USDA-ARS Davis, California, USA

Using Automated Tracking to Link Individual Behavior to Colony Performance in Bumblebees - James Crall, Harvard University, USA           

12:15 p.m. - Lunch Break

Lunch is open from 11:30 AM—1:30 PM at Segundo Dining Commons

1:45 p.m. - Session 2: Drivers of Host-Pathogen Interactions

DWV as a Driver of Host Bee Decline - Robert Paxton, Martin-Luther University, Germany

Novel transmission routes and intensification as drivers of disease emergence and virulence in honeybee viruses - Mike Boots, UC Berkeley, USA

Viral transmission in honey bees and native bees supported by a global BQCV phylogeny - Elizabeth Murray, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, USA

Drivers of Pathogen Distributions in Feral and Managed Honey Bees - Panuwan Chantawannakul, Chiang Mai University, Thailand          

Serratia marcescens, a Pathobiont of Honey Bees? - Kasie Raymann, University of North Carolina Greensboro, USA  

Foreign fungi in native bees across the Commonwealth of Virginia - Kathryn LeCroy, University of Virginia, USA

Traits as Drivers of Plant-Pollinator-Pathogen Networks - Quinn McFrederick, UC Riverside and Scott McArt, Cornell University, USA

4:30 p.m. - Poster Session 1 and Networking (ARC Ballroom)

6:30-8:30 p.m. - Welcome Reception

 

Friday, July 19, 2019

6:45—8:30 AM - Breakfast at Segundo Dining Commons

9:00 a.m. - Keynote: Bee Nutritional Ecology: From Genes to Landscapes

Christina Grozinger, Penn State University, USA

10:00 a.m. - Session 3: Climate Change Impacts on Bees

Bee responses to climate change: from micro- to macroecology - Jessica Forrest, University of Ottawa, Canada

A climate vise of temperature extremes may explain past and predict future bumble bee range shifts - Michael Dillon, University of Wyoming, USA

Climate change effects on Megachilidae bee species along an elevation gradient - Lindsie McCabe, Northern Arizona University, USA

Testing the phenological mismatch hypothesis for a plant-pollinator interaction - Charlotte de Keyzer, University of Toronto, Canada

Phenological mismatch between bees and flowers early in the spring and late in the summer - Gaku Kudo, Hokkaido University, Japan

Climate change impacts on Brazilian pollinators - ​​​​​Tereza (Cris) Giannini, Federal University of Para, Brazil

Climate change effects on the status, distribution, and phenology of California bumble bees - Leif Richardson, University of Vermont, USA

12:15 p.m. - Lunch Break

Lunch is open from 11:30 AM—1:30 PM at Segundo Dining Commons

1:45 p.m. - Session 4: Causes and Consequences of Pesticide Use: from use patterns to pollination services

A New Framework for Environmental Risk Assessment of Pesticides - Francisco Sánchez-Bayo, University of Sydney, Australia

Potency paradox: Patterns and Drivers of Insecticide Use in U.S. Agriculture - Maggie Douglas, Dickinson College, USA

Estimating Pollinator Pesticide Exposure - Maj Rundlof, Lund University, Sweden

A Risk Assessment of Neonicotinoid Insecticides in New York - Travis Grout, Cornell University, USA

Risk of exposure in soil and sublethal effects of systemic insecticides applied to crops on adult female ground-nesting bees using the hoary squash bee as a model species - D. Susan Willis Chan, University of Guelph, Canada

Delayed lethality: The effects of a widely-used fungicide on honey bees (Apis mellifera) - Adrian Fisher II, Arizona State University, USA 

Sub-lethal Impacts of Pesticides on Bees - Troy Anderson, University of Nebraska, USA

5:00 p.m. - Poster Session 2 and Networking (ARC Ballroom)

Saturday, July 20, 2019

8:00 a.m. - Registration (ARC Ballroom)

6:45—8:30 AM - Breakfast in Segundo Dining Commons

9:00 a.m. - Session 5: Integrative Approaches to Improving Bee Health Across Landscapes

Combining physiological and ecological data for more effective bee protection and conservation - Cedric Alaux, INRA, France

Keeping bees in a warming world: Protein biomarkers for heat stress and queen failure diagnostics - Alison McAfee, North Carolina State University, USA          

Factors influencing colony survival in migratory beekeeping based on honey bee resistance traits - Michael Simone-Finstrom, USDA-ARS, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

Temporal and spatial dynamics of pollinator communities across North Carolina agroecosystem - Hannah Levenson, North Carolina State University, USA

The effects of land cover on habitat quality for nesting bumblebees - Genevieve Pugesek, Tufts University, USA

Improving Bee Health in Canola Pollination - Shelley Hoover, Agriculture and Agri-Food, Canada

Mitigating Land Use Decisions that Destroy Bee Forage - George Hansen, Foothills Honey, Oregon, USA

Impact of landscape-scale floral resources availability on pollinator communities - Aaron Iverson, Cornell University, USA

Why are crops mainly visited by broadly polylectic bee species? - Katja Hogendoorn, The University of Adelaide, South Australia

12:15 p.m. - Lunch Break

Lunch is open from 11:30 AM—1:30 PM at Segundo Dining Commons

1:40 p.m. - Session 6: Pollinators in Urban Environments

Presentation by The Wonderful Company

Honoring new California Master Beekeeper graduates - Elina Nino, UC Davis, USA

Floral trophic ecology of a North American metropolis revealed by honey bee foraging assay - Doug Sponsler, Penn State University, USA

Pollinators and urban warming: A landscape physiology approach - Elsa Youngsteadt, North Carolina State University, USA 

Green infrastructure to support urban wild bees: Communicating science to practitioners - Scott MacIvor, University of Toronto, Canada

Linking pollinator health, microbiome composition and human provisioning in Anna’s Hummingbird (Calypte anna) - Rachel  Vannette, University of California Davis, USA

The effect of land use on a sexually selected characteristic of the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) in the United States - Anne Espeset, University of Nevada, Reno, USA

Urban pollinator conservation opportunities: integrating research with policy and practice - Katherine Baldock, University of Bristol, UK

Beekeeping ordinances: Protecting bees and neighbors - Tracy Ellis, San Diego County Department of Agriculture, California, USA

Beekeeping in the city: Successes and challenges - Charlie Blevins, San Francisco Beekeepers Association, USA

Urban pollinator conservation: Bee City USA as a model for meaningful community engagement - Phyllis Stiles, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, Oregon, USA

Electric power companies protecting pollinators - Jessica Fox, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, USA

5:00 p.m. - Closing remarks

 

Poster Sessions

Thursday July 18

Novel quantitative approaches

1

Plant-pollinator networks created from DNA metabarcoding data in eastern Oregon are more complex than those created from behavioral observations

Arstingstall

Katherine

2

INSIGHTS IN THE UNDERSTANDING OF FACTORS UNDERLYING THE STRUCTURE OF PLANT-POLLINATOR NETWORKS IN TROPICAL FORESTS

Cuartas Hernández

Sandra

3

Determining monarch (Danaus plexippus) natal site distribution in Nevada using stable isotope analysis and wing morphometrics

Gosse

Cassidy

4

USE OF VIDEO IN HONEY BEE MANAGEMENT

Gross

Bridget

5

Bees on the MAPP: establishing the Minnesota Agriculture for Pollinators Project landscape experiment

Herron-Sweet

Christina

6

Value of insect-mediated pollination service to apples in us industrial sectors using an input-output framework

Jordan

Alex

7

Managing Pollination Services: A Model of Substitution between Wild Pollinator Habitat and Honey Bee Hive Rental

Lichtenberg

Elinor

8

Land-use effects on the delivery of ecosystem services

Mandelik

Yael

9

Mechanics of honey bee pollen pellet removal

Matherne

Marguerite

10

The bees of Minnesota, progress to date

Portman

Zachary

11

The consequences of worker size variation on demography

Salazar

Timothy

12

DEEP LEARNING FOR IMAGE-BASED BEE IDENTIFICATION

Spiesman

Brian

13

BEES, MICROBIAL ‘MEAT,’ AND OTHER SACRILEGE

Steffan

Shawn

14

Evaluating shared pollinator taxa that provide services across

Willcox

Bryony

15

Improved spring low-temperature storage of Megachile rotundata

Yocum

George

Drivers of host-pathogen interactions

0

Eating microbes make for better bees

Dharampal

Prarthana

16

Does host lifestyle, genetics,

Damico

Megan

17

Mite migration and increasing deformed wing virus levels in honey bee colonies in the fall

DeGrandi-Hoffman

Gloria

18

Does habitat quality ‘dilute’ pollinator disease risk instead of biodiversity? ‘Habitat health’, an alternate explanation for reduced

Fearon

Michelle

19

Mechanisms mediating bee pathogen transmission: deposition, persistence and

Figueroa

Laura

20

The Unintended Antibiotic Target:

Hoopman

Alexis

21

Options for Chalkbrood Control in Multiple Bee Systems

Klinger

Ellen

22

The Effects of Copper on the Growth of a Bumble Bee Parasite, Crithidia bombi

Leger

Laura

23

Investigating the potential for pathogen spillover and pesticide exposure for honey bees and wild bees foraging from blueberry

Montero-Castaño

Ana

24

Microbial metabolites mediate bumble bee

Schaeffer

Robert

25

Antimicrobial Lipid Transfer Proteins are a Common Feature

Schmitt

Anthony

26

BIG BEES SPREAD DISEASE: A TRAIT-BASED APPROACH

VanWyk

Jennifer

27

SHARED FLOWERS, SHARED PARASITES? HONEY BEE FLORAL VISITATION IS LINKED

Zbrozek

Maryellen

28

Pollinator disease transmission dynamics:

Davis

Abby

29

Temporal dynamics of multi-host parasite prevalence in species-rich plant and pollinator communities

Muniz

Paige

30

DISEASE ECOLOGY OF NATIVE BEES

Hisatomi

Lauren

31

Deformed wing virus induces a metabolic switch

Heerman

Matthew

86

Nectar inhabiting microbes induce pollen germination

Christensen

Megan

 Climate change impacts on bees

32

Changes in the phenology of the southeastern blueberry bee

Anderson

Sarah

33

Effects of Climate Change on Nesting Habits of Megachilidae Bee

Baldwin-Rowe

Janice

34

The Empire State Native Pollinator Survey – determining the conservation status of NY

Danforth

Bryan

35

EXPLORING REGIONAL VARIATION IN BLUE ORCHARD BEE PHENOLOGY, BEHAVIOR, AND REPRODUCTIVE

Dunn

Morgan

36

Effects of management techniques on reproductive strategy in crop-

Johnson

Makenna

37

Native bees exhibit species and ecosystem-specific changes in abundance with aridity

Kazenel

Melanie

38

The Assessing the Effects of Fluctuating Temperature Regimes on Commercial and Wild Bombus

Lindsay

Thuy Tien

39

Plant drought stress alters floral volatile emissions, and reduces

Mallinger

Rachel

40

The effect of temperature on Penstemon heterophyllus nectar and pollination success

Russell

Kaleigh

Causes and consequences of pesticide use

41

Toxicity of premixed insecticide chemistries to female blue orchard bees

Belsky

Joseph

42

Development and validation of a bumble bee adult chronic oral test

Cabrera

Ana

43

Genotoxicity Assessment of Agrochemicals

Campion

Claire

44

EFFECTS OF A COMMON FUNGICIDE ON OLFACTORY

DesJardins

Nicole

45

Pesticide exposure for bees during blueberry

Graham

Kelsey

46

Toxicity of some ready-to use garden pesticides to non-Apis bees

Joshi

Neelendra

47

Assessing the Effects of Common Garden Pesticides on Alfalfa

Kline

Olivia

48

PESTICIDE RISK REDUCTION FOR HONEY BEES THROUGH

Melathopoulos

Andony

49

The Impact of Thiamethoxam on Drone

North

Heather

50

A comparison of acute toxicity endpoints for adult honey bees with technical grade active

O'Neill

Bridget

51

Routes of exposure to solitary bees for pesticides

Pitts-Singer

Theresa

52

How does consumption of nectar secondary compounds impact bumblebees exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide?

Richman

Sarah

53

Heterogeneous pesticide exposure and variation in mechanism and rate of honey bee colony losses

Rinkevich

Frank

54

Effects of fungicide on Bombus vosnesenskii microbiome composition and foraging choices

Rutkowski

Danielle

55

The importance of pesticide exposure

Schmehl

Daniel

56

Impacts of neonicotinoid pesticides on insect olfactory processing

Tatarko

Anna

57

Integrating Pest and Pollinator Management

Ternest

John

58

A side-by-side comparison of honey bee health in colonies

Underwood

Robyn

59

Pesticide exposure of wild bees visiting pollinator hedgerows

Ward

Laura

60

Quantifying pesticide contamination of bee-collected pollen in

Zawislak

Jon

61

The impact of viruses on honey bees at the individual and cellular levels

Flenniken

Michelle

 

Sustainable landscape enhancement to reduce pesticide

Vakil

Surabhi

 Friday, July 19

Integrative approaches & bee health

62

Maximizing the Potential and Minimizing the Cost of Prairie Seed Mix Design for Wild Bees

Borchardt

Kate

63

Wildflower plantings promote blue orchard bee, Osmia lignaria (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), reproduction in California almond orchards

Boyle

Natalie

64

Optimization of pollinator seed mixes from low resolution data

Bruninga-Socolar

Bethanne

65

Floral foraging traits impact pollinator susceptibility to pesticides and parasites

Cohen

Hamutahl

66

Dissecting the physiology of the nurse worker

Corby-Harris

Vanessa

67

Calling all bee scientists: data needed to conserve native pollinators

Cornelisse

Tara

68

Effects of Native Ungulate Herbivory on Native

DeBano

Sandra

69

Nectar changes the ecological costs of defended pollen

Francis

Jacob

70

Assessing the vulnerability of specialty crops to pollinator decline in

Gaines Day

Hannah

71

EVALUATING INTENSIVELY MANAGED CONIFER FORESTS

Galbraith

Sara

72

Effect of native vegetation proximity on bee diversity

Groom

Scott

73

Sustainable landscape enhancement to reduce pesticide

Gupta Vakil

Surabhi

74

Diverse plates and picky eaters:

Guzman

Aidee

75

Saved by the pulse: temporal resource pulse

Hemberger

Jeremy

76

The Regulation of Pheromone Biosynthesis by MicroRNAs in the Mandibular Gland of the Honey Bee (Apis mellifera)

Jasper

W. Cameron

77

Wild bee responses to landscape resources and topography vary seasonally

Kammerer

Melanie

78

Honey bee preferences for lipid-rich pollen diets

Lau

Pierre

79

Effects of Nectar Contents on the Foraging Preferences of Honeybee (Apis mellifera) on Asian pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai)

Lee

Kyeong Yong

80

Think big: Landscape variables predict

Liczner

Amanda

81

Native bee and shrub interactions

Mitchell

Scott

82

Corridors through time: does resource continuity impact pollinator

Nicholson

Charlie

83

PREFERRED PLANTS FOR POLLINATORS:

Nzie

Onyeka

84

Stingless bee nutrition altered by landscape simplification

Obregon

Diana

85

Habitat prescriptions for safeguarding wild bees

Pindar

Alana

86

Open for other session above

 

 

87

DO HERBACEOUS LAND ENHANCEMENTS ENHANCE HONEY BEE

Quinlan

Gabriela

89

DISSECTING THE ROLE OF NECTARY-SPECIFIC

Roy

Rahul

90

Utilizing whole genome sequencing to identify genomic signatures

Saelao

Perot

91

ANALYSIS OF NUTRIENT PROFILE OF POLLEN

Sayre-Chavez

Brooke

92

Direct and interactive effects of nutrition and pesticide stressors on the solitary bee Osmia lignaria

Stuligross

Clara

93

EXPLORING THE IMPACT OF PRESCRIBED FIRE

Tai

Taylor

94

Pesticides and other effects on honey bee colony health

Rinkevich

Frank

95

Plasticity in the pre-diapause nutrient sequestration period of bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) queens

Watrous

Kristal

 Urban Pollinators

96

Investigating the attractiveness of native wildflowers

Anderson

Aaron

97

RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION TECHNOLOGY USE

Bandivadekar

Ruta

98

Educating the Public About Bees: the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven

Casey

Christine

99

Identifying Trends and Gaps in Pollinator Health

Dias

Abigail

100

The role of commercial ornamental plant varieties

Erickson

Emily

101

BEE DIVERSITY AND ABUNDANCE IN URBAN LANDSCAPES

Keane

Kit

102

THE GEORGIA TECH URBAN HONEY BEE

Leavey

Jennifer

103

URBAN BEE DIVERSITY AND ABUNDANCE MONITORING

Mason

Lisa

104

ARE URBAN POLLINATOR PLANTINGS THE BEE’S KNEES

Park

Mia

 Urban Pollinators

96

Investigating the attractiveness of native wildflowers

Anderson

Aaron

97

RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION TECHNOLOGY USE

Bandivadekar

Ruta

98

Educating the Public About Bees: the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven

Casey

Christine

99

Identifying Trends and Gaps in Pollinator Health

Dias

Abigail

100

The role of commercial ornamental plant varieties

Erickson

Emily

101

BEE DIVERSITY AND ABUNDANCE IN URBAN LANDSCAPES

Keane

Kit

102

THE GEORGIA TECH URBAN HONEY BEE

Leavey

Jennifer

103

URBAN BEE DIVERSITY AND ABUNDANCE MONITORING

Mason

Lisa

104

ARE URBAN POLLINATOR PLANTINGS THE BEE’S KNEES

Park

Mia

 Pollinator ecology

106

The effect of landscape context on hoverfly communities

Deutsch

Kaitlin

107

Tritrophic interactions and monarch larval success

Diethelm

Aramee

108

Postfire environment reveals floral limitation

Mola

John

109

SPATIO-TERRITORIAL NETWORKS IN MALE CARPENTER

Schoof

Stefan

110

What factors affect the foraging pattern of bumble

Shibata

Akari

111

BEES IN THE TREES: FOREST CANOPY RESOURCES FOR ORCHARD POLLINATORS

Urban-Mead

Katherine

112

Drivers of bee-mediated pollen dispersal in a fragmented

Waananen

Amy

113

Potential resource competition between managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and native bees within natural areas in Florida

Weaver

James

114

Pollinator Diversity in Northeastern Utah,

Williams

Mary-Kate